BICYCLE CHAIN CLEANING TOOL. CLEANING TOOL(Tue)


Bicycle chain cleaning tool. Proform xp 70 exercise bike



Bicycle Chain Cleaning Tool





bicycle chain cleaning tool






    bicycle chain
  • A chain that transmits the driving power from the pedals of a bicycle to its rear wheel

  • a chain that transmits the power from the pedals to the rear wheel of a bicycle





    cleaning tool
  • A device for removing jammed equipment, especially nuts, from a route. Also known as a nut key.

  • n. A metal tool used in the extraction of protection that has become stuck in the rock.

  • A narrow metal device with a hooked end used for removing nuts or cams stuck in cracks. Also employed post-climb as a beer bottle opener.











bicycle chain cleaning tool - Park Tool




Park Tool CM-5 Cyclone Chain Cleaner


Park Tool CM-5 Cyclone Chain Cleaner



The CM-5 Cyclone Chain Scrubber uses an extra large solvent reservoir and a series of rotating brushes to get chains really clean. A magnet at the bottom of the Cyclone’s solvent reservoir draws particles scrubbed from the chain, effectively keeping them from being redistributed on the chain during cleaning. Durable sponge material draws solvent from the chain as it exits the Cyclone, reducing drips and mess. To make it easy to control and use, we’ve even added a handle. Works with all multi-speed bikes and some single-speed models.










85% (12)





Masi Sprint A 7 28 11




Masi Sprint A 7 28 11





In the November 2011 edition of Bicycling magazine, there was this article, "Bicycling 50 Golden Rules."

"Over the last half-century, we've tried thousands of methods to become stronger, faster, and smarter on a bike - many of which have been discarded through the years. These have endured."

So this article was the main feature and came as a 'centerfold' in the middle of the magazine, which is appropriate for what amounts to a magazine of cycling-porn for knuckleheads with $10,000 bicycles and 10 cent legs.

So I start skimming through the assorted golden-nuggets-of-wisdom and I'm struck dumb by Number 4 -- keep in mind, this is the Number 4 most important awe-inspiring piece of advice of all time according to Bicycling magazine... 45 other hot-tips had to follow behind our Number 4 winner... know what it was?

"Avoid Helmet Hair."

"For God's sake, make sure your hair is under your helmet and not poking out the front," advises Garmin-Cervello pro Christian Vande Velde.

This led to a discussion with Kath re: what would I have selected as the most important pieces of advice I have been given or things I have learned over the years. That really got me to thinking.

So I'm going to post out some of the best pieces of advice, ways of thinking about cycling, techniques, etc. culled over my approximately 30 years of cycling.

#10: Be comfortable. Get to know your bicycle and the best positions for you. Take the time to adjust saddle height, handlebar height, handlebar tilt, saddle tilt, etc. to find the fit that best suits you. I use a handful of formulas pro racers have used over the years when setting up a new bike, but regardless of whether you're setting a new bike up on your own, or are being fitted at the bike shop, experiment. The more comfortable you are on the bike, the easier it will be to pile on the miles.

#9: Sports Drinks should be diluted to 1/2. This is something I figured out training long miles during the summer in Nevada. On a long training ride or during a long race, your body needs nutrition and hydration. When your body is trying to stay hydrated, full-on sports drinks are too sugary for the body to get the hydration it needs quickly. Too much sugar in the gut can force your body to dedicate resources in blood to digestion and absorption of nutrients that it would be better off without. On your next longt ride, dedicate feeding times to taking in nutrition, and dilute the Gatorade or other sports drink to one-half strength. Don't limit your fluid intake. You should notice an improvement.

#8 Learn how to repair your bike. Twice each year, I tear down, clean, and lubricate every component on my bikes. I always try to get components with so-called 'loose-bearings' that allow for quick and easy overhauls. I still run Campagnolo low-flange hubs on some of my bikes... 25 years and counting. There are plenty of good tutorials online these days on how to true your rims. spend the money, buy the tools and practice tuning your bike back up to speed. It's the easiest way to spot problems. Cone wrenches, chain breakers, cog tools, bottom bracket tools, spoke wrench, truing stand, etc.

#7 Race. Even if it's just local club races, this is where you'll ultimately learn how to draft, how to sprint, how to ride faster and farther than you ever thought possible. Stay away from criteriums for the first year of racing. Get some good, long road race milesw under your belt first.

#6 When racing through a turn be at the front and the inside into the turn. This was a tip given to me by Edgar Leano from his Cafe Columbia days. The idea is if I'm, say, the fourth one through a sharp turn, I want to be as close to the inside of the turn as I can safely go. If somene goes down in front of me, the centrifugal forces will carry him away from me, and I can avoid a pileup. In a criterium, always try to be near the front... there's less to go wrong.

#5 more to follow











Fresh From The Shed...




Fresh From The Shed...





Hi all, sorry I haven't put any new pictures out recently, it's been a combo of me not remembering to take them/then getting sidetracked and forgetting to post them. Perhaps these will make up for it. :D

(I typed this up Friday when I brought the bike home, and saved it, this is why it won't quite sync up with the next group of photo's I'll post.)

A. friend of mine approached me last week, and told me that he discovered a shed on a property he recently bought. It was fairly well hidden in the woods, so it was pretty much found on accident. From the looks of the trees growing all around it (and no obvious path to/from it,) plus an extremely rusty Master lock on the door, it's been unopened for a good while. He told me that he planned on clearing out part of the area sometime this year, and this shed would be going along with some of the trees. He told me if I could get in, whatever was in there, I could have (since I'm a bit of a "collector" of all things old) whatever I found of interest. Brought home a Victorian-era DC current floor lamp, all cast iron, with an "Edison" bulb still in it, some old tools, some other misc. items, and under a bunch of old burlap sacks and boxes, a B.F. Goodrich (Schwinn) Fleetliner II bicycle. It was originally blue/white, and had a headlamp (I suppose, judging by the wiring) and a button for a horn(?) on the "tank." It's in rough shape, the tires still hold air (!!!) although I wouldn't dare ride on them. The chain is still good, the kickstand still has tension, etc.

_______________

I'm fairly sure of the route I'm going to be going with this. I plan on replacing the tires (check) polishing all the chrome (half-check) replacing the chain, if diesel fuel doesn't clean it up, and then using a product I was told about called "Safest Rust Remover" to remove all the rust from the frame+seat without harming any of the original paint. I was considering repainting the bike when I got it home, but, by the looks of it, if it turns out OK after I use the rust cleaner, I'll likely leave it in it's original state, and put some clearcoat over it to protect it, so it doesn't start to rust again.. Of course, if the paint simply isn't there afterwards, the only option is to repaint it, which, won't be hard, since the entire frame is white (with minor pinstriping) and the tank, chain guard, and parcel tray are blue (with pinstriping.) If painting is the way to go, I'm going to try as hard as I can to locate some decals for it, so it looks like a well-done repaint.











bicycle chain cleaning tool








bicycle chain cleaning tool




Dremel 760-04 Two-Speed Cordless Golf Cleaning Rotary Tool






We don't believe there's a golfer on the planet who wouldn't like a better score, and this little Dremel kit is a dream come true. Any compacted soil on your clubs can affect your trajectory; but a quick buzz with this neat little gizmo and your clubs are ready for the Masters. You can also clean off your golf spikes with the special bristle-brush attachments for a smooth pivot. The pros' caddies clean their clubs before every shot, and we think it'll be your habit, too, once you try out this handy kit. The carrying case clips neatly right to your golf bag and because it runs on good old AA batteries, there's never any recharging. Two smooth speeds deliver the power you want, and changing brushes is a snap. It's the perfect gift for the golfer who has everything except a perfect score.

We don't believe there's a golfer on the planet who wouldn't like a better score, and this little Dremel kit is a dream come true. Any compacted soil on your clubs can affect your trajectory; but a quick buzz with this neat little gizmo and your clubs are ready for the Masters. You can also clean off your golf spikes with the special bristle-brush attachments for a smooth pivot. The pros' caddies clean their clubs before every shot, and we think it'll be your habit, too, once you try out this handy kit. The carrying case clips neatly right to your golf bag and because it runs on good old AA batteries, there's never any recharging. Two smooth speeds deliver the power you want, and changing brushes is a snap. It's the perfect gift for the golfer who has everything except a perfect score.--Kris Jensen-Van Heste










See also:

used gt mountain bike

pedal bike car

dirt bike rim decals

80cc motor bike

good downhill bikes

bike v brake

stationary exercise bicycle



tag : bicycle chain cleaning tool coors light mountain bike buddy basket

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